About Face: Human Expression on Paper exhibit at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

A study of human emotions on view in Galleries 691–692 from July 27 to December 13, 2015 at the The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The representation of human emotion through facial expression has interested western artists since antiquity. Drawn from The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collections of drawings, prints, and photographs, the diverse works in this installation, ranging from portraits and caricatures to representations of theater and war, reveal how expression underpinned narrative and provided a window onto the character and motivations of the subjects, the artists, and even their audience.

 

Desire (from Heads Representing the Various Passions of the Soul; as they are Expressed in the Human Countenance: Drawn by that Great Master Monsieur Le Brun) | Engraver: Anonymous, British, 18th century | Artist: After Charles Le Brun (French, Paris 1619–1690 Paris) | Credit Line: The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1953 | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

 

 

Medea | Artist: Charles Antoine Coypel (French, Paris 1694–1752 Paris) | Credit Line: Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1953 | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

 

Heads Studyies for ‘Castor and Pollux Freeing Helen’ | Artist: Joseph-Ferdinand Lancrenon (French, 1794–1874) | Date: 1817 | Credit Line: Purchase, Renée Sacks Bequest, 2005 | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

 

A French Dentist Shewing a Specimen of His Artificial Teeth and False Palates | Artist: Thomas Rowlandson (British, London 1757–1827 London) | Date: ca. 1811 | Credit Line: The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1959 | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

 

Head of a Youth with Open Mouth | Artist: Jakob Matthias Schmutzer (Austrian, Vienna 1733–1811 Vienna) | Date: 1765–1810 | Credit Line: Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1953 | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

 

Simple Bodily Pain (from Heads Representing the Various Passions of the Soul; as they are Expressed in the Human Countenance: Drawn by that Great Master Monsieur Le Brun) | Engraver: Anonymous, British, 18th century | Artist: After Charles Le Brun (French, Paris 1619–1690 Paris) | Credit Line: The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1953 | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

 

 

Source: About Face | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

 

ABOUT FEATURED IMAGE:

Image source: Heads Studyies for ‘Castor and Pollux Freeing Helen’ | Artist: Joseph-Ferdinand Lancrenon (French, 1794–1874) | Date: 1817 | Credit Line: Purchase, Renée Sacks Bequest, 2005 | The Metropolitan Museum of Art | About Face | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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